100 Films @ 10: Most Represented Directors

It’s 100 Films’ 10th birthday at the end of the month. To mark the occasion, I thought in the run-up to it I’d publish some lists based on the last ten years of my blog, because who doesn’t love a list?

How many lists have I got? Why, 100 of course!

…haha, no — that would be ridiculous. There are ten — one for each year of 100 Films. And each one has ten items on it. Ten times ten is… why, it’s 100! What a coincidence.

For the first list, I’ve put opinion aside for pure facts: these are the ten directors who’ve been most-reviewed on this blog. That excludes films only featured in my 100 Favourites series — this is just their work that has been covered as part of my ‘main’ blog.

It may be worth noting that, because it’s purely based on statistics, this isn’t a list of my ten favourite directors… though as they’re ones I keep watching movies by, I guess it’d be a fair starting point.

10
Christopher Nolan

Christopher Nolan has made nine feature films, and seven of them are reviewed here. Throw in an extra one for the IMAX version of The Dark Knight and his short documentary, Quay, and he edges ahead of runners-up John Carpenter, Ernst Lubitsch, George Miller, and Billy Wilder.

9
Tim Burton

The next four directors are technically tied, but I’ve found a way to differentiate them. First: the Burtonesque Tim Burton, whose eight entries can be split into six main-list films and two reviews of things I’d already seen (Batman and Batman Returns).

8
Ridley Scott

Next, the man we can probably thank for all the Director’s Cuts we get these days, the more classical of the two Scott brothers, Sir Ridley Scott. He also has eight, of course, which factors in six main-list films, one alternate cut that I nonetheless counted on my main list (Blade Runner: The Final Cut), and one non-main-list film (Alien: The Director’s Cut).

7
Zack Snyder

Our third eight-film filmmaker is everyone’s favourite “visionary” director of superhero movies (right?), Zack Snyder. All eight of his films were on the main list, though two of them were alternate versions (the extended cuts of Batman v Superman and Watchmen).

6
Clint Eastwood

Simple and straight-up, much like the main himself, Clint Eastwood has a pure eight films.

5
Steven Soderbergh

The top five heads into double figures, with ten films for one-time enfant terrible and now retiree Steven Soderbergh.

4
Martin Scorsese

Perpetual awards season snubee, Martin Scorsese also has ten feature films, but edges ahead thanks to his part in anthology film New York Stories.

=2
Roy William Neill / Steven Spielberg

Unlike other directors on this list, there’s no reasonable way to differentiate this pair. You may not know the name Roy William Neill, but he helmed eleven of the fourteen Sherlock Holmes films starring Basil Rathbone, and those four years of work have landed him near the top of this list. Conversely, Steven Spielberg is probably the most famous film director working today, if not ever, and his eleven films span 44 years, stretching from his first (1971’s Duel) to his most recent Oscar nominee (2015’s Bridge of Spies).

1
David Fincher

Topping the list is my go-to pick for favourite director, David Fincher. He’s helmed ten movies, but I’ve reviewed twelve — that’s eleven main-list features (including the Assembly Cut of Alien³) and one extra for the marginally-extended director’s cut of Zodiac.

Tomorrow: when directors re-cut.

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7 thoughts on “100 Films @ 10: Most Represented Directors

  1. So not an order of the best, but rather of how prolific, or of the number of films you saw/reviewed? In that case, I’ll give you a pass- because otherwise, where are Kubrick and Hitchock? Or Carpenter? Actually, they really should be in this list anyway- you should start ‘hitting’ their films (or more of them, anyway) I think!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yep, entirely statistical. Fincher’s a bit of a ‘cheat’, even, because I re-watched & reviewed all of his films in the run-up to The Social Network. Without that, he’d be two or three lower.

      I’ve been watching a lot more Carpenter in the past year or two. I think Halloween might be the only one of his I’d seen before this blog, so there’s plenty of catching up to do! Kubrick I seem to be progressing through at a rate of one per year. How little Hitchcock I’ve actually seen is a shocking oversight on my part, though. I really need to put more effort in there.

      Like

      • Actually, I tell a lie: I saw Carpenter’s Village of the Damned when I was much younger. We rented it on video because my dad liked the book and it starred Superman, and that’s pretty much all I remember about it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Its funny, someone who ‘discovers’ Carpenter via some of his later work could be forgiven for avoiding him forever after, and they would miss some definitive cult classics. I guess the same could be said of Hitchcock too.

          On the other hand, you have some major gems to discover!

          Liked by 1 person

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